Relive 1984 With This Lego Apple Macintosh 128k

Ryan Lego Apple Macintosh 128k

You too can relive 1984 with this Lego Apple Macintosh 128k. Ryan McNaught built the Mac, and almost everything else on the desk out of Lego. The Rubik’s Cube, Pencil/Pen Cup, the Pens, Calculator, Rolodex, and even that little Pencil are all Lego. The only thing that is not are the wires connecting the keyboard and mouse. This MOC took Ryan over 22 hours to build with some 4,500 pieces. There are so much beige bricks. Some of the best details include the retro multi-colored Apple logo, the keys on the keyboard, and the plates used as the rolodex cards. But the best detail is the screen and icon. This Lego Mac seems a little less happy then normal.

Ryan Lego Apple Macintosh 128k, Happy Mac Icon

Check out this Lego Macintosh 128k over here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanmcnaught/31665884644/

These Learning Lego Bookends Hold Knowledge

Deborah Higdon's Lego Bookends

You can put your Lego creations to good use by making them into bookends. Check out these Lego bookends by Deborah Higdon. The theme is “learning,” which is very appropriate. Each side features a vignette of learning. The left bookend is an old time schoolroom, complete with wood burning oven. The map hanging over the desks uses some rubber bands to help give a more realistic appearance, mimicking the coast lines. There is also a brick built mosaic of a mountains landscape, and the desks even recreate that old iron detailing. On the other side of the books, is the right bookend. This scene is of a dorm room. A completely different habitat compared to the schoolroom. Here many life lessons can be learned. The room features an unmade messy bed, a dead desk plant, a laptop, and many many expensive textbooks.

Deborah Higdon's Lego Bookends Deborah Higdon's Lego Bookends Drom

Check out these Lego Bookends by Deborah Higdon here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/buildingsblockd/19177089656/

LegoGenre | 00307: “Great Scott. It’s me! Then, it is true. All of it.”

LegoGenre 00307: “Great Scott. It’s me! Then, it is true. All of it.”

“Great Scott. It’s me! Then, it is true. All of it.”

128k. A Mini Lego Apple Macintosh.

customBRICKS's 128k Lego Apple Macintosh

customBRICKS has created this minifigure scale Lego Apple Macintosh. This micro 128k computer is perfectly simple. Every piece has its place, and no Lego piece is superfluous. This little guy is actually a micro version of Chris McVeighs larger Lego Mac “hello.” which can be seen here. I don’t believe the 128k can get any cuter.

Check out the customBRICKS’s 128k over on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/custombricks/9737958177/

A Lego Macintosh. “Hello.”

Chris McVeigh's Lego Macintosh Hello

There are a few iconic computer designs. One of the most recognizable is the original Apple Macintosh, also known as the Macintosh 128k. With its 512 × 342 black and white display happily greeting the world with a friendly “hello.” Chris McVeigh, aka: powerpig, has created one of the most popular Lego MOCs of one of the most popular computers. There are even free instructions available at http://chrismcveigh.com/cm/welcome.html. You can also buy a custom kit based on the 128k Mac. Hopefully the Lego version is a bit cheaper then the original $2,495 price tag.

Check out the Lego Macintosh over at http://chrismcveigh.com/cm/welcome.html

Chris McVeigh has been featured on LegoGenre before with this amazing IT Crowd scene: http://everydaybricks.com/moss-flip-its-an-iphone-its-a-flipping-iphone-in-the-crane-machine-it-crowd/

Old Lego Truck

Carl Merriam's Old Lego Truck

This old style Lego truck makes you wish that Lego would release some historical sets. Treat it like the current architectural sets, but with a more historical/museum quality theme. This Lego Old Truck is designed by Carl Merriam, and can be viewed on Flickr. Using a window piece worked out perfectly for the old style radiator, and including such details as wooden spoked tires, and a wooden truck bed help to sell the retroness of this vehicle.

The wood tiles used to create the truck bed, were specifically chosen to showcase the custom printing from Print-A-Brick. They help to create a retro look to the pickup that would be harder to achieve without. The logo featured on the door is also a custom brick from Carl Merriam.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/39069854@N07/8875046709/

Steam-Bots: The Steampunk Robot

CptBrick’s Steam-Bots: The Steampunk Robot

Little tiny robots are one of the best genres of MOC builds, and when someone changes it up a little it can really stand out. For instance these Steam-Bots don’t look very deadly, but the steampunk robot on the left has a chainsaw for a hand. The choice of color and pieces is really nice, the ice cream for steam and the gold/brown color scheme really helps sell these robots. Hope you didn’t spend all your money on your new top hat and mustache cream, as robot insurance would come in handy here.

Capt. Brick over at Flickr is responsible for these little Steam-Bots: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cptbrick/8741472985/

Lego Printed & Named Beams & Bricks

Gary Istok’s Printed/Named Beams 01

Back before the Pirates, before the Minifig, even before Duplo, Lego introduced the Town System. With this new system came the first named beams and printed bricks. Usually produced on white 1×6 and 1×8 bricks. These printed bricks were so popular at the time that there were hundreds and hundreds of varieties available in different colors and typefaces.

Gary Istok’s Printed/Named Beams 02

The very first printed/named bricks hit the stores in 1955, just 6 years after Lego introduced their original sets. Since these bricks were there in the beginning, their availability matches the spread of Lego across Europe. First appearing in Danish, Norwegian and Swedish. Originally these bricks were available in a Named Beams set (Set No. 1224). As Lego started selling in new countries, they started translating these printed/named bricks in all the different languages. By 1962 Lego was offering printed/named bricks in Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, Portugal, Italy, France, Finland, Britain, Ireland, United States, Canada, and Australia. Most of these countries had bricks printed in their own native language, with one interesting exception. Lego never printed Portuguese bricks.

The bulk of these printed/named bricks were made in the 1950–1960’s. Since working with ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) plastic was relatively new the printed/named bricks were often misprinted. The typefaces that Lego worked with were originally hand–lettered before being transferred to the molds. There is nothing directly comparable to this printing today, the closest results are found with Flexography (Flexo) printing, which is commonly found on plastic shopping bags.

A very wide variety of typeface styles can be found on these Lego bricks. Anywhere from Sans Serif, Serif, Slab Serif, Script, and Decorative styles were available. The imperfections of coming from hand–lettering greatly contributed to their personality. Some of this printing is interesting in that they exhibit reverse stress on the letters. This is especially noticeable with the “TAXE” and “TABAK” bricks.

Gary Istok’s Printed/Named Beams 03

As time moved on, so too did most of these unique typefaces. By the time the 1970’s came around Sans Serif typefaces were standard, and most of the charm of these named bricks started to fade. These printed/named bricks would completely die out before the 1980’s, being replaced with the much cheaper, and more versatile, sticker. Today Lego only prints a few bricks a year, and almost never text. Making this an interesting relic from the past.

Gary Istok’s Printed/Named Beams 04

One last thing; some of these bricks are a product of their time, especially the “TABAK” and “SIGARETTEN” bricks. You would never find a product marketed to children today with a tobacco reference.

Credit & More Information.

All of the above images were provided by Gary Istok. Who, can be found on the Eurobricks website as the Lego Historian. He has written extensively about printed/named bricks/beams here, and here. Also, for extremely detailed information about “Thousands of things you probably never knew about Lego sets, Lego parts, and Lego related items…” make sure check out Gary Istok’s “The Unofficial Lego Sets/Parts Collectors Guide (1949–1990’s)” which is available for DVD and Download. Seriously, his work is awesome.